New Apple Book on Tim Cook: From ‘Mister Rogers’ to ‘Attila the Hun’

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tim cook appleNew details about CEO Tim Cook’s leadership style and personality were revealed in an excerpt from a soon-to-be-released book about Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) that was recently published by the Wall Street Journal. The upcoming book by Yukari Kane is titled, Haunted Empire, Apple After Steve Jobs and it describes Apple’s corporate culture following the death of legendary CEO Steve Jobs.

In the book excerpt, Cook comes across as a pragmatic and hard-working CEO who is meticulous about every detail of Apple’s business. Cook’s detail-oriented management style appears to mesh perfectly with Apple’s work culture. On the other hand, there are far fewer details about Cook’s personal life. The Apple CEO is intensely private and employees knew very little about him when he assumed control of the company after Jobs’s death.

“The new CEO was a mystery,” wrote Kane in a book excerpt published by the Wall Street Journal. “Some colleagues called him a blank slate. As far as anyone could tell, Cook had no close friends, never socialized and rarely talked about his personal life.”

According to Kane, employees who casually knew Cook perceived him as a kindly “Mister Rogers” character. However, Cook was also a demanding operations chief and referred to himself as the “Attila the Hun of inventory.” He was known for using his naturally calm and quiet demeanor to intimidate employees that he felt were not meeting his exacting standards.

“He could do more with a pause than Jobs ever could with an epithet,” wrote Kane via the Wall Street Journal. “When someone was unable to answer a question, Cook would sit without a word while people stared at the table and shifted in their seats. The silence would be so intense and uncomfortable that everyone in the room wanted to back away.”

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