Was CBS a Super Bowl Winner or Loser?

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Super Bowl XLVII proved how big of a business American football truly is; the game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens scored the highest rating share in history.

Despite the 35-minute delay in the third quarter due to a power outage, the game earned CBS (NYSE:CBS) an average overnight household rating of 48.1 in Nielsen’s metered markets, an increase of 1 percent over last year’s match. This means 48.1 percent of households in the U.S. tuned in for the game. CBS will release the total number of viewers Monday afternoon, but, with the ratings increase, the figure is expected to beat last year’s record 111.3 million viewers. That game was the most-watched television program in U.S. history.

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The Super Bowl, which determined the champion of the National Football League for 2012, was broadcast in more than 180 countries and in more than 30 different languages, making it one of the most important sporting events for advertisers. This year, the average 30-second spot cost $4 million or more, a 90 percent increase from a decade ago. With such a high number of viewers and such a large amount of money at stake, Super Bowl commercials have become almost as important as the game itself, and the best advertisements become a part of television history. Not only are they a form of entertainment, but the commercials bring the broadcasting network a record amount of advertising revenue

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