Fiscal Cliff: New Chapter, Same Story

  • Like on Facebook
  • Share on Google+
  • Share on LinkedIn

John BoehnerOn Sunday, Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio) concluded a long and tenuous chapter in the fiscal cliff discussions. Deciding to leave ideological trench warfare behind, Boehner has agreed to accept tax increases on the wealthy and a higher total revenue target as components of a solution to the fiscal cliff. Now it is up to the other side of the aisle to leave their fox holes and approach no man’s land.

The current top tax rate of 35 percent, established through the Bush tax cuts, is set to expire on January 1 as part of the fiscal cliff trigger. Previously, Republicans insisted that the Bush tax cuts remain in effect for everybody, where Democrats wanted to keep the tax cuts only for those who made less than $250,000 per year. This means a tax hike on those making more than $250,000 annually, with the rate moving from 35 percent to 39.6 percent, where it was under the Clinton administration.

Catalysts are critical to discovering winning stocks. Check out our newest CHEAT SHEET stock picks now.

Boehner’s new proposal concedes to the Democratic initiative, keeping tax rates low for the vast majority of Americans while increasing the rate for the country’s top earners. However, his proposed cut-off point is $1 million instead of $250,000. The figure could be seen as a starting point that Democrats will try to negotiate down, but given the magnitude of the concession already it’s unlikely that this number will change very much…

More Articles About:

To contact the reporter on this story: staff.writers@wallstcheatsheet.com To contact the editor responsible for this story: editors@wallstcheatsheet.com

Yahoo Finance, Harvard Business Review, Market Watch, The Wall St. Journal, Financial Times, CNN Money, Fox Business