Landon Donovan Contemplates His Final World Cup

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Photo Courtesy of Noelle Nobel, licensed through Flickr via Creative Commons

Photo Courtesy of Noelle Nobel, licensed through Flickr via Creative Commons

Landon Donovan, soccer player for the Los Angeles Galaxy and strong candidate for best American to ever play the game, told ESPNFC that Brazil, the host for this summer’s World Cup, would likely be his last chance to compete in the prestigious event. “It’s hard for me to imagine, sitting here, that I’ll be able to walk in four years, much less play soccer,” said the 32-year old, who is the U.S. Men’s Nationals scoring leader. The next World Cup is scheduled for Russia in 2018.

For a player who began his career signing a massive six-year deal at the age of 16 with German club Bayer Leverkusen, who played in the prestegious┬áBundesliga league in 1999, Donovan took a sharp left from the career of many professional footballers by abandoning Europe to play in the US in 2001. This may come as a shock to some, but Major League Soccer, or MLS, is not considered one of the premiere leagues in the world (even though David Beckham plays here now and everything). Donovan was able to play for the San Jose Earthquake, an MLS team, in 2001 due to soccer’s special contract rules around loaning.

In essence, being on loan is exactly as it sounds — a player is signed with one team but plays for another. Sometimes the arrangement is financial: the second club will pick up some or all of the player’s contract for the duration of the loan. Other times it can be an opportunity for a player to get more playing time, or, like in Donovan’s case, a clash of civilizations. Whatever the case may be, Donovan’s loan to San Jose was fortuitous, as he led them to an MLS Championship in his first year with the team.

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