Will California Split? Ballot Initiative Drafted to Divide Six Ways

  • Like on Facebook
  • Share on Google+
  • Share on LinkedIn

San Francisco, California

Tim Draper, a venture capitalist from Silicon Valley, has a new future in mind for California. California, he says, has become too big, making it too dysfunctional to govern as it is now. Draper is behind a ballot initiative that is suggesting the U.S. state with the highest population be split into six parts. He insists that Californians “would be better served by six smaller state governments,” according to USA Today. “Vast parts of our state are poorly served by a representative government,” said Draper. He is presently working to get the initiative through the first of the qualification stages, but it could come back around to voters by November.

In an interview, according to USA Today, Draper rattled off a list of problems facing the state. He said that it had once been a model for other parts of the nation, but that now it faces public school problems, high prison costs, transportation, and water infrastructure issues, and that these things would only “get worse” without change. “California is not working,” said Draper. He suggests that the subsequent collaboration and competition between its separate parts would be beneficial — and he’s not the first to think so.

Others in the past have suggested that California would be better off split into a varying number of parts. However, many are skeptical about the practicalities behind such an idea, including Raphael Sonenshein, executive director of the Pat Brown Institute of Public Affairs for California State Univeristy. “It’s certainly fun to talk about,” he told USA Today, but saying that, “Its prospects are nil. I don’t think anyone is going to give California 12 Senate seats.”

More Articles About:

To contact the reporter on this story: staff.writers@wallstcheatsheet.com To contact the editor responsible for this story: editors@wallstcheatsheet.com

Yahoo Finance, Harvard Business Review, Market Watch, The Wall St. Journal, Financial Times, CNN Money, Fox Business