Marco Rubio Is Ready for 2016 With Dig on Global Warming

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How can you tell someone’s eyeing the presidency? He (or she) brings up Benghazi. How can you tell someone may be a Republican? In the case of Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, he rejected human influence on the climate over the weekend while he announced that he was considering a presidential run. And yes, he hit on Hillary Clinton’s time as secretary of state, even pausing to get in a quick remark that was probably directed at Rand Paul (R-Ky.). Clearly he’s ready for a race. Now appears to be the time for candidates to announce that they’re thinking of running, but so far, no one — from Jeb Bush to Clinton to Paul — is ready to commit just yet.

Rubio’s views on potential opponents aren’t what got everyone talking over the weekend, notable as those opinions are. Regarding Clinton, Rubio gave her an “F” for her time as secretary of state, saying to ABC: “I’m sure she’s going to go out bragging about her time in the State Department. She’s also going to have to be held accountable for its failures, whether it’s the failed reset with Russia or the failure in Benghazi that actually cost lives.” Regarding Paul, Rubio indirectly touched on Paul’s desire to run for both the presidency and the Senate as a back-up, saying that if he goes out for the presidency, he won’t be attempting reelection in Florida.

“I believe that if  you want to be president of the United States, you run for president. You don’t run for president with some eject button in the cockpit that allows you to go on an exit ramp if it doesn’t work out,” Rubio said. Opponents aside, ultimately it was his discussion of global climate change that says the most about what kind of president he’d be and what kind of policy preferences he’d hold in an election.

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