House Passes Paul Ryan’s Budget, But That’s as Far as It’ll Go

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The House of Representatives’ passage of Rep. Paul Ryan’s budget came as no surprise to anyone — nor should John Boehner’s harsh rhetoric come as a shock, since the only thing that would actually raise eyebrows would be the budget’s survival in the Senate. Dubbed “path to prosperity” by its creators, the budget would cut food stamps and Medicaid, as well as including a provision for removing Obamacare, leading President Barack Obama to call the budget a “stinkburger” in a speech given in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

For House Speaker Boehner (R-Ohio), the bill is Republicans’ “vision for getting Americans back to work,” and for Ryan, it’s “a matter of trust,” because “Who knows better: the people or Washington? We have made our choice with this budget.”

The House passed the budget with a vote of 219-205, with all House Democrats voting against it, as well as 12 House Republicans. The budget’s increase to national defense and decrease in social programs has led the president to criticize it for sacrificing the well-being of the middle class, but Boehner claims it will aid in job creation.

“The House is going to continue to focus on the American people’s priorities: creating good-paying jobs, increasing wages, and expanding opportunities for all Americans. This means reforming our job training and skill programs, advancing bipartisan charter school legislation, critical water and highway infrastructure bills … and repealing and replacing Obamacare,” said Boehner at a recent press briefing. He also referenced the coming election, saying that Democrats who “continue to play their usual politics” by “pitting one group of Americans against another” have “fallen flat,” as Americans see that “these political votes provide no answers.”

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