Gynecologists Make More Than Umpires: Industries and How Well They Pay

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Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

Have you ever wondered how much an orthodontist makes? A professional athlete? Or perhaps you’d just like to know what the best industries are these days in terms of jobs and wages in the employment market. Luckily, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) new report on occupational employment and wages has come out for the month of May in 2013. Let’s take a look at a few highlights from the report.

First off, lets satisfy some wage curiosity before outlining general top job markets and best paying industries. Orthodontists make an average of $196,270 in annual salary, while athletes and sports competitors make an average of $71,850 — a number that would undoubtedly be higher if one were looking specifically at averages of big league teams. Umpires make about $33,020 a year, and clergy members make around $47,540 in the same span. Funeral Service Managers make $80,250, and gynecologists make about $212,570 every year, while psychiatrists make $182,660 — all payed more than operators of nuclear-power reactors who make an average yearly salary of $78,410. Crossing guards, on the other hand, pull in $26,530 annually.

Fast-food cooks make an average of $18,870, with the top paying job in the food preparation and serving industry, chefs and head cooks, at just over twice that at $46,620. Anesthesiologists earn the highest yearly salary on average at $235,070. This includes beating out surgeons as the second highest. The BLS gives an average salary for writers in the media and publication fields that suggests, on average, I should probably be given a raise.

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