The 5 Worst College Majors If You Want to Make Money

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Numerous studies have been done regarding which colleges are the most difficult, prepare students the best, and are the most prestigious. Other studies have considered which majors students should consider. While there is definite worth in choosing to study something that is of interest and that you are passionate about, that alone may not be enough if you want to have a career and make money.

PayScale ranked 130 different majors by salary potential (salary meaning total compensation including base salary, bonuses, profit sharing, commissions, and also overtime if applicable.) The numbers include full-time employees with a bachelor’s degree only, and over 1,000 colleges and universities were included from across the nation. For the purpose of our article, we are highlighting the bottom five on the list, which indicate the worst college majors for salary potential.

1. Child and Family Studies
Students studying child and family studies face a median starting salary of $29,300, and a mid-career salary $37,700. These salaries are very low, and many people without a college education could easily make this much or more each year. Students who choose to study this major do learn important life skills, including interpersonal, research, analysis, critical thinking, presentation, problem solving, and other skills. Although these skills might be important to some employers, you can learn them in many other majors as well — and probably make more money. If you do choose this major, you will most likely end up working with children or families, possibly as a program coordinator, outreach specialist, or a caregiver. This type of training could also lead to a job as a therapist or school counselor, but you would have to go to more school (and the salaries on the list are based on bachelor’s degrees.)

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