Retirement Communities: The Good and the Bad

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Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

Retirement can be a fun time filled with new opportunities for relaxing activities and adventures. However, determining where you want to live after you retire can be difficult. While maintaining a home or living in an apartment are two possible ideas, other people move into retirement communities. Retirement communities are housing areas designed for retired (or partially retired) individuals, many of whom can take care of themselves with little or no assistance. Many people enjoy retirement communities because they foster a sense of safety and community. As all the people are retired, people living in these communities can often find things in common.

However, retirement communities are not entirely positive; like all housing options, they have pluses and negatives. If you are considering a retirement community, read on to get a big picture of the many sides of retirement communities.

There are many different types of retirement communities, from large apartment buildings, homes, and also mobile homes, or RV communities. Some communities encourage home care assistance, whereas others house people who can primarily care for themselves. Many communities have specific age requirements, and often include staff members or committees that oversee community involvement and activities. Meals also differ at different communities; some communities eat at least one meal together (and often more), whereas other communities basically involve people living and completing all parts of life separately, except occasionally coming together for specific events or activities.

The first thing you would want to determine if you are considering a retirement community is which type of community you would want to live in. If you are looking for limited interactions with others, but you feel comfortable being around others your age, then you might want to an independent community. On the other hand, if you prefer a lot of entertainment and amenities, you should consider a community that is more in-line with that type of lifestyle.

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