It’s Easy Being Green: 5 Plants to Grow For Fresh Produce

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Get your green thumbs ready because growing your own vegetables can be a cost effective way to get fresh produce all summer long. As Better Homes and Gardens points out, it is possible to get 10 pounds of fruit from a $2 tomato plant — it really doesn’t get much cheaper per tomato than that. Of course, there are other costs associated with gardening, especially if you’re just starting out, but it can be a sound investment if you want to put the effort into gardening. The positives far outweigh the negatives when it comes to planting and pruning. Caring for a garden gets you outside, breathing in fresh air, and adds activity to your daily life.

You’ll need to plan ahead, taking into consideration how much space you have available. By and large, vegetables require a lot of sunlight, good soil, and plenty of H2O. Gardening also varies by region, and the Almanac provides area-specific information, as well as other tips. It also has plenty of information on the different crops you can plant in your own backyard, and how to care for them. To see what the Almanac has to say about five beginner-friendly plants you can grow and then use in your kitchen, keep reading.

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/gpaumier/

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/gpaumier/

1. Cucumbers

Grown when the weather is warm, cucumbers can fit into any garden because they can climb (use trellises if you want them to grow vertically). You want to grow them in a sunny spot, in neutral to slightly alkaline soil that is at least 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Since you want warm soil, do not plant cucumbers until at least two weeks have passed since the last frost. After planting, do not be inconsistent in your watering because this will yield bitter tasting fruit. When you harvest your cucumbers will depend on the variety. Regular slicing can be picked when the reach 6 to 8 inches, dills at 4 to 6, and burpless can be 10 inches or longer when plucked. Store your cucumbers in the refrigerator for up to ten days.

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