Sorry, Kurt Cobain Vultures: Craigslist Ad Was All a Sub Pop Prank

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Nirvana, Kurt Cobain

Earlier this week, an ad popped up on Craigslist advertising a sale of some of Kurt Cobain’s personal belongings, allegedly coming from a former roommate of the Nirvana frontman. Multiple media outlets picked up the ‘story’ of the anonymous roommate crawling out of the woodwork to make a buck off some stuff that he probably could have sold a long time ago.

Items in the Craigslist ad include a pair of skis for $800, a Swatch phone that Cobain supposedly used to speak to record executives in Los Angeles when Nirvana was in the process of inking their major label contract for $575, and a TONY handheld video game that the writer claims Kurt enjoyed playing for $425. The writer of the ad explains that the items are of historical significance because they belonged to Kurt, which is why they are so expensive.

“Hey Seattle what’s up, I used to live with Kurt Cobain back in the 90s and I have been holding on to a bunch of his stuff that he left in a box when he moved out. He owed us rent and said he would get the box when he came back and gave us money but he never came back, then when he was famous he never really talked to any of us again because Courtney never liked us but she’s a dick so no hard felings,” the ad reads.

It turns out the ad was all a joke from serial prankster and Sub Pop employee Derek Erdman, who has pranked Nirvana fans before. Sub Pop is the iconic grunge label that put out Nirvana’s first album and helped cultivate the grunge scene of the early Nineties. Erdman admitted to the prank in an interview with Revolt, saying that he didn’t even own any of the stuff featured in the ad, but used photos from the Internet.

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