10 Toughest SUVs and Trucks

Here’s a reassuring but wholly unsurprising little fact: Vehicles that are built to be tough are proving to be among the toughest of them all, judging by the latest study yielded by iSeeCars.com‘s seemingly endless pool of sales and vehicular data.

“There tends to be two types of car owners in this world, those who want their cars to run as long as they can, and those who anticipate switching cars every 2-5 years and care less about seeing the odometer hit six figures,” the site says. “If you fall into the first group then one of the most important aspects of buying a new or used car is data on the longevity of the vehicles.”

“Many of today’s car owners like to see how far they can take their cars, whether it be for financial reasons or based on principle,” said Phong Ly, co-founder and CEO of iSeeCars.com. “And, unlike many cars from the 20th century, there are a variety of vehicles built these days that are made to — and will — go the distance.”

By using data from the 30 million car classifieds on its site, iSeeCars was able to determine the percentage of specific vehicles with more than 200,000 miles on their clocks. Notably, the study does not take into account the climate that the car is on sale in, nor the weight of highway versus city driving. It does reveal, though, that by and large, SUVs and trucks are typically on the road the longest, a measure in which the stalwarts of longevity — midsize sedans, much of the time — fell outside the top ten.

Here are the ten longest-lasting vehicles, per iSeeCars.com.

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10. GMC Sierra 1500

The GMC (NYSE:GM) Sierra 1500 rounds out the top ten, as 1.6 percent of the Sierras for sale on iSeeCars.com have surpassed the 200,000-mile marker. The line runs parallel to Chevrolet’s Silverado pickup, and underneath the surface, much of the two vehicles are the same, though the GMCs are aimed more at professionals and offer more creature comforts inside the cabin. The Chevrolet ranked 20th, with 1.4 percent, indicating that owners will hold on to their Sierras longer.